Galco.jpg                 

  



 

Dog dies from saltwater poisoning days after day at the beach
Tampa, Florida
   
 
More Today's News:
ߦ   Domestic Violence Awareness Month Sees Strong Prosecution of Abusers
ߦ   How a 100-Year-Old Car Theft Law Led to the Modern FBI
ߦ   4 charged for illegally purchasing firearms
ߦ   Another young man charged with making online threats
ߦ   Coast Guard rescues 2 mariners near Cameron, Louisiana
ߦ   Final Defendant Convicted in $189 Health Care Fraud Scam
ߦ   Final men sentenced for robbing local business with a firearm
ߦ   Former Mexican governor extradited on money laundering charges
ߦ   K-9 Rudy & K-9 Kaja Retirement Ceremony
ߦ   Mexican national sent to prison for cocaine conspiracy
ߦ   More charged in RGV auto loan scam
ߦ   Oil Executives Guilty for Roles in Bribery Scheme Involving Foreign Officials
ߦ   Paris Police Dept - Daily Call Summary
ߦ   Police Extract Man Barricaded Inside House

 
Search Archives:

A Bay Area veterinarian is issuing a warning to pet owners after a dog accidentally died from saltwater poisoning.

Chris Taylor says he had no idea a swim at the beach with his dog would put his black lab in the hospital, but as the vet explains, dogs can easily get salt water confused for fresh water.

"He had such a vibrant spirit," Taylor said. "If there was a tennis ball and a stick in a big body of water that's what he would love to do most."

Taylor is struggling to come to grips with the death of his 6-year-old black lab, O.G., who died accidentally after swallowing too much salt water at the beach.

"Towards the end of the evening, he was obviously tired and little wobbly after a long day at the beach," Taylor said. "We took him to the car. He had a little bit of diarrhea he didn't feel that well."

That was Monday. The next day, Taylor says O.G. seemed to be feeling better but by Wednesday he stopped eating and even stopped responding when Taylor would call his name.

He rushed him to the animal hospital but, shortly after arriving, O.G.'s brain started swelling. O.G.'s body stopped responding to the medicine.

Taylor says he was forced to put his loyal companion down.

"It still feels surreal," Taylor said. "It doesn't feel like reality. I [have] to get a grip on that and realize that it is real and he's gone."

It's a tragedy Taylor says no dog owner should ever have to go through.

Veterinarian Dr. Melissa Webster explained saltwater poisoning is tough to spot because every dog reacts differently.

"When I brought my puppy to the beach for the first time, I was literally there for only 10 minutes," Dr. Webster said. "He was drinking it like it was water in the pool. So for him, 10 minutes was more than enough."

"Even though we had fresh water and he was drinking that and we took breaks," Taylor said. "Accidents can still happen."

Dr. Webster says next time you take your dog to the beach, make sure you have plenty of fresh water. If your dog starts to experience diarrhea or vomiting, it could be a sign of saltwater poisoning.

If that happens, be sure to call your vet as soon as possible.

Post a comment
Name/Nickname:
(required)
Email Address: (must be a valid address)
(will not be published or shared)
Comments: (plain text only)
Printer Friendly Format  Printer Friendly Format    Send to a Friend  Send to a Friend    RSS Feed  RSS Feed
© 1999-2019 The Police News. All rights reserved.