Galco.jpg                 

  

50 club.jpg

 

Child Dies After Getting into Hot Car
Wichita Falls
   
 
More Today's News:
ߦ   AG Paxton?Sends Letter to Cameron County Warning that it Must Allow Religious Private Schools to Open
ߦ   Don't Mess with Texas® Calls on Iconic Texas Voices to Stop PPE Litter
ߦ   Father drowns in Galveston while swimming with daughter
ߦ   Fraud Alert: Scammers Who Claim to be with the Department of Justice are Preying on the Elderly
ߦ   Gang-member rapper who glorified guns sentenced to federal prison for illegal possession of a firearm
ߦ   Juvenile Certified To Stand Trial For Murder As An Adult
ߦ   Operation Legend: Case of the Day
ߦ   Small plane that crashed in Texas had just taken off
ߦ   Statement by Attorney General William P. Barr on the Tracking Down of Fugitive Michael Forest Reinoehl
ߦ   TCSO Responds to Multiple Calls for Boats in Distress
ߦ   Texas U.S. Attorneys Announce $18 Million in Domestic Violence Funding from DOJ’s Office on Violence Against Women
ߦ   8-year-old boy shot in road rage in southeast Houston
ߦ   Coast Guard corrects aids to navigation after Hurricane Laura
ߦ   Crimes, Criminals, and the Cops Who Chase Them
ߦ   Deputies honored for distinguished service

 
Search Archives:

July 20, 2020 – Tragically, a 4-year-old boy died after wandering away from the home and getting into a vehicle in Wichita Falls, TX on Saturday (7/18).

 

Texas ranks #1 in the nation by a large margin based on the number of child hot car deaths with 137 fatalities since 1991. This year, KidsAndCars.org has documented 10 fatalities nationwide, 2 of which were in Texas. The last two years were the worst years in history for child hot car deaths with a total of at least 107 children that died nationwide. 

 

As parents and caregivers focus on several priorities at once during these unprecedented times, supervision can be more difficult than ever. Young children climb into unlocked cars and trunks to play, but they can’t always get out. With fewer parents and caregivers traveling to work, and fewer children attending childcare and preschool, it is imperative that all drivers, even those without children, lock their vehicles so children cannot gain access. 

About 26% of hot car deaths are the result of children getting into vehicles on their own and not being able to get back out. 

Safety tips to make sure children cannot get into a parked car:

Keep vehicles locked at all times, especially in the garage or driveway. Ask neighbors and visitors to do the same.

Never leave car keys within reach of children.

Teach children to honk the horn if they become stuck inside a car.

If a child is missing, immediately check the inside, floorboards and trunk of all vehicles in the area very carefully.

 

The Hot Cars Act passed the full House on July 1, 2020 as part of the Moving Forward Act (H.R. 2).  The Hot Cars Act is a federal bill that would require available, affordable technology to detect the presence of a child inside a vehicle. KidsAndCars.org is working with parents whose children have died in hot cars to make sure it is implemented quickly. 

 

While education and awareness about hot car deaths is at an all-time high, so is the number of children that continue to die in hot cars. Education and awareness are not enough. The technology exists to prevent these unthinkable tragedies. What are we waiting for?

 

Hot car deaths continue to take place because nobody believes this could happen to them. Please help us raise awareness about these predictable and preventable tragedies.

 

Fact sheetssafety tipsgraphics, images, PSAs, etc. are available to help raise awareness in your community.

Post a comment
Name/Nickname:
(required)
Email Address: (must be a valid address)
(will not be published or shared)
Comments: (plain text only)
Printer Friendly Format  Printer Friendly Format    Send to a Friend  Send to a Friend    RSS Feed  RSS Feed
© 1999-2020 The Police News. All rights reserved.