Galco.jpg                 

  

50 club.jpg

 

Wichita, home of fatal 'swatting' case, launches alert system for gamers and police
Wichita, Kan.
   
 
More Today's News:
ߦ   Watch: Lone female officer takes down man armed with knife: “I will f-ing slice your f-ing throat.”
ߦ   Houston Police Appreciation Rally
ߦ   5-year-old found unresponsive after being pulled out of off-road park swimming area
ߦ   Child backed over, killed in Hardin County
ߦ   El Paso Man Faces Federal Charge of Posting Threatening Communications over the Internet
ߦ   Eleven Charged With Federal Gun Law Violations
ߦ   Identify Most Wanted Federal Fugitives
ߦ   Man Charged In Minneapolis Police Third Precinct Arson
ߦ   Nine Pharmacists Charged for Role in $12.1 Million Health Care Fraud Scheme
ߦ   Stopping Hackers in Their Tracks
ߦ   Suspects caught on camera dumping liquid at Houston bar that exploded
ߦ   Woman Charged With Arson of Two Philadelphia Police Cars During Protests
ߦ   "The Black Lives Matter Foundation" Raised Millions. It's Not Affiliated With The Black Lives Matter Movement.
ߦ   Houston law enforcement looking at how to be transparent with public
ߦ   HPD officer retires before scheduled hearing over social media post with racial overtones

 
Search Archives:

The program is voluntary and open to any person who thinks they could fall victim to swatting

By Chance Swaim
The Wichita Eagle

WICHITA, Kan. — Wichita police will begin placing alerts on addresses where potential swatting targets could be living, the department announced Friday.

The program is voluntary and open to any person who thinks they could fall victim to swatting, a false report to law enforcement meant to draw a large police presence to a particular address. The practice has been growing in popularity on the fringes of the online gaming community, including a case in Wichita that ended in tragedy.

In Wichita’s swatting case, police shot an unwitting and unarmed man on his front porch after Tyler Barriss, 26, called from California and reported a murder and hostage situation at 1033 W. McCormick, the former address of a gamer involved an online dispute.

Wichita police swarmed the home and when 28-year-old Andrew Finch stepped out onto his front porch, he was shot and killed by Officer Justin Rapp.

Finch was not involved in the online game, and his family has filed a lawsuit against the city. Rapp, who is still employed by the Wichita Police Department, was not charged in Finch’s death. Barriss was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison for a host of swattings and bomb hoaxes he made to schools, government buildings and businesses across the country.

“Anyone can be the target of swatting, but victims are typically associated with the tech industry, video game industry, or the online broadcasting community,” Wichita police Officer Paul Cruz said in a news release.

The swatting alert system would place an alert on addresses provided by potential victims. Those alerts would be available to first responders, including Sedgwick County 911 and the officers responding to a call.

“This alert would not minimize or slow emergency services but rather would create awareness for officers responding to potential swatting incidents,” Cruz said.

Request forms to put an alert on an address is available at wichitapolice.com and local police stations.

©2019 The Wichita Eagle (Wichita, Kan.)

Post a comment
Name/Nickname:
(required)
Email Address: (must be a valid address)
(will not be published or shared)
Comments: (plain text only)
Printer Friendly Format  Printer Friendly Format    Send to a Friend  Send to a Friend    RSS Feed  RSS Feed
© 1999-2020 The Police News. All rights reserved.