Serial killer Little indicted in Lubbock for 1993 murder
Lubbock, Texas
   
 
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Ector County Texas Sheriff's Office shows Samuel Little. Little has been indicted in Lubbock County for the 1993 strangulation of Bobbie Ann Fields-Wilson. (Ector County Texas Sheriff's Office via AP)

A Lubbock grand jury has indicted the man described as the most prolific serial killer in United States history for a murder in 1993.

ABC 7's media partner Fox34 in Lubbock is reporting that Samuel Little has been indicted for the 1993 strangulation of Bobbie Ann Fields-Wilson. Her body was found in a field near Keel Avenue and East 12th Street on Aug. 8 of that year.

In November, the Lubbock Police Department reported Little did not appear to be connected to any unsolved homicides here. But, the plan was to continue investigating any potential leads. Since that announcement, investigators have worked possible connections, which led to this indictment.

Multiple law enforcement agencies, including Lubbock Police, the Lubbock's Sheriff's Office and the Department of Public Safety will hold a news conference providing more information Thursday afternoon at 2 p.m.

Little is currently held in California State Prison.

RELATED: Judge sentences serial killer for Cincinnati murders by Skype

Little, 79, over the past few months has provided investigators with details for murders dating back to the 70's.

The murder count is now more than 90. This includes possible links to deaths in 13 states, including Texas. Investigators with both Lubbock Police and the Sheriff's Office said in November they were aware of Little's connection and have began looking into it.

RELATED: Texas prosecutor: More than 60 deaths now linked to serial killer

"It's an anxious time," Lieutenant Bryan Taylor said in November. "They just have to put their faith in law enforcement and science."

In 2006, Little was arrested for shoplifting at the Walmart near Fourth Street and the West Loop. He spent two weeks in jail after his conviction in 2007. Taylor said in November that the Sheriff's Office has been figuring out the time period Little was here.

"If we do have DNA suspect on a profile or anything that would link any certain individual to a victim, obviously that would be one of the first things that we look into," Taylor said in the interview last year.

The Sheriff's Office stated in November it would not disclose any potential connected cases, so investigators could work potential leads.

Barron Slack with the District Attorney's Office said in November that until law enforcement brings the evidence to them, the office would not take any action.

"A confession in Texas law would require us to corroborate it with independent evidence," Slack said in November. "So there are the weird circumstances where somebody claims they do something that they didn't do, so the law requires us to have some form of supported evidence to corroborate the confession before we'd have any prosecutable situations."

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